Pearls in engagement rings

and how to care for them

Japanese Pearls in weddings

Like in many cultures white is symbolic of purity of brides. Often in Japanese Shinto weddings the bride will don Tsunokakushi and Shiromuku, (a white hat and dress for wedding ceremonies) while the groom will wear a black kimono. In Japan the popularly of western or Christian and Catholic weddings has grown ever since the start of the Meiji era. The Meiji era opened the lines for western fashion and ideals into Japan, leading to brides and grooms to be to don more modern fashions. Pearls in all shades of colors are used in the more modern weddings of today since dresses allow more access for accessories to be worn, especially white pearls. It`s totally possible pearls can be worn with the Shinto weddings clothes as well. What about before the wedding? Many have questioned if Pearl rings would make nice Engagement or Promise rings, but the fact is they can! Not only were pearls historically mounted in engagement rings but, pearls have been used for centuries in weddings worldwide. Compared to diamonds, pearls are the 2nd most used gem in wedding ceremonies. There are also many types of pearls and gemstone combinations that can keep your budget in mind. Perhaps pearl engagement rings are the best choice for your significant other.

Credit: (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Ytoyoda)

Structure and Durability

Many people worry about damaging pearl rings due to what could happen if you were to wear a pearl ring everyday but, pearl rings are not so fragile. Pearls are made from 3 things which are calcium carbonate, conchiolin, and other organic things, conchiolin is like a glue that helps the nacre in a oyster get layered on a pearl. The nacre of a pearl is actually calcium carbonate, which can react with acidic substances. Other organic things in the oyster gives the pearl it`s unique shine and color, so the type of oyster, food and area may affect what color of pearl you may get. Pearls are harder than a copper coin so anything less hard than copper will not scratch your pearls.

How to care for pearl rings

The other point people talk about is the structure of pearl rings themselves, many worry about snapping the pearl off the band but, this does not happen as much as you think. If you exercise just a little bit of caution you won`t have to worry about the worse happening, here is a couple of tips. Taking your pearl rings off when you are washing dishes, swimming in a pool, doing hard work, and sleeping is a good first step into taking care of your rings in general. If you wipe your rings with a damp smooth cloth after wearing them it can help to preserve the integrity of your pearl ring. And the last tip, try not to apply lotions, soaps or perfumes when wearing pearl rings and bracelets, getting personal care products on your rings can degrade the integrity of pearls, degrade luster and adherence to bands and strings.

In conclusion

Pearl jewelry is not as fragile as some people think and are more durable in certain designs. Taking a little bit of precautionary care in your pearl rings, bracelets, and necklaces can ensure heirlooms for your children. Getting in the habit of following the tips spoken about earlier can be easy to do and can extend to other pieces of future jewelry. Unlike other jewelry wholesalers our designs limit damage from wear are tear like our Tahitian Princess Rings which have a collar around the base of the pearl, also some of our designs have a way to flex on impact, reducing shear point of the base of the pearl ring such as our Luna rings. If you want more tips on how to care for your pearl jewelry check out our blog 5 things to notice on your pearl necklace. If your pearl jewelry is broken due to an accident then our pearl masters can repair it, most of the time on the spot.

 

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